Naturalists' News and Sightings

From swimming pool to ice rink

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I have just done 'David's' feeders - lots of tits. The flowing floods have retreated from the new wet meadow which is now covered in ice. Graham

from Graham Bateman:12 February 2021

Sightings

Beautiful Demoiselle

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I saw this Beautiful Demoiselle in my garden in Henwood for the first time ever!

 

from Margaret Abel: 23 May 2022

Muslin Moth

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This Muslin Moth female was resting on our window today - first macro-moth I have seen in the garden this year!

 

from David Guyoncourt: 10 May 2022

Peat-free compost fungi

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The peat free compost I use is based on wood fibres.  It grows masses of tiny toadstools.  Can anyone suggest an ID? Photos show one Antirrhinum in a pot of 10cm diameter with more than a dozen toadstools. Underside view shows gills with black spores.

(email ID suggestions to news@abnats.org.uk)

from Gillian Taylor: 19 April 2022

Scarlet Elf Cups

Scarlet Elf Cup fungi amongst moss on fallen branch.

While clearing a path along the riverside wood in Barton Fields we found these Scarlet Elf Cups growing on a well-rotted branch.  We  have found these before in late winter/ early spring so are not usually found in autumn forays.

from David Guyoncourt: 6 March 2022

First butterfly sighting for 2022

Today I saw my first male brimstone butterfly of the year, it was at Lashford Lane nature reserve (BBOWT) in Wootton. In sunshine of course.

from Felicity Jenkins: 1 February 2022

Little Egret return to River Stert

A Little Egret has again been a regular visitor to River Stert in North Abingdon over the past few weeks, since the Environment Agency cleared a build-up of vegetation.

from Adrian Allsop: 15 December 2021

Winter thrushes and fallen apples

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This week my fallen apples have attracted 2 song thrushes, 7 redwings, 2 fieldfares and up to 13 blackbirds including this one with white on the head.

from Gillian Taylor: 2 December 2021

What's been eating our roses and tomatoes?

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My sharp-eyed grandson spotted this large green caterpillar with yellow ‘go faster’ stripe, eating our tomato plants. It turns out to be the larva of the Bright-line Brown-eye Moth (Lacanobia oleracea) also called the Tomato Moth.

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Today I noticed some shiny boldly-spotted caterpillars with erect stance, eating the leaves of our rose. They turn out to be Large Rose Sawfly larvae. I am happy to share my plants with both of these larvae.

from  David Guyoncourt: 11 September 2021